NEW Derwent Graphik!

12 August 2014

NEW Derwent Graphik!

We’re very excited to introduce you to our new range – Derwent Graphik pens!

There are two fabulous pens in the range; Line Makers and Line Painters.

The Line Maker is a waterbased pigment pen available in 3 different colours and 6 nib sizes: Black 0.05 / 0.1 / 0.2 / 0.3 / 0.5/ 0.8, Sepia 0.1 / 0.3 / 0.5 and Graphite 0.1 / 0.3 / 0.5. Available individually and in sets of 6 Black, 3 Sepia, 3 Graphite and 3 Black.

NEW Derwent Graphik!

LOVE: Smooth free flowing lines, perfect for illustration

COLOUR: Build up tone with pure inky colour in Sepia and Graphite Grey.

STRONG: Rich pure black pigment

Quality: Super Japan nib, lightfast pigment ink.

NEW Derwent Graphik!

Fionn Jordan, Graphik Line Maker

 

The star of the show is the Line Painter; a waterbased pigment painter! There are 20 colours available, all with a 0.5mm nib, dilute with water and permanent once dry. Available individually and in 4 sets of 5 complimentary colours.

NEW Derwent Graphik!

NEW Derwent Graphik!

LOVE: Fluid opaque paint from a fine 0.5mm nib.

COLOUR: Immense depth of colour, even on a dark background

STRONG: Create layers, dribbles and washes with a specially developed colour range.

QUALITY: Super Japan nib, permanent waterbased paint.

NEW Derwent Graphik!

Carne Griffiths, Graphik Line Painter

NEW Derwent Graphik!

Also available in the range is the Derwent Graphik H2O brush. A paintbrush with a reservoir which adds a new dimension to working with Line Painters. And we also have the Inspire Me Books. 80 perforated pages of bleed proof marker paper, featuring printed patterns to inspire your illustrations, drawings and doodles. Available in 2 sizes 20cm square and 14cm square.

www.derwentgraphik.com

www.derwentshop.co.uk

www.carnegriffiths.com

www.fionnjordan.co.uk

 

Comments
10:16 by Kirsty Vickers Kirsty Vickers

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

10 July 2014

Today I'm sharing how to make your own Ink Sprays using Inktense Blocks and an art journal page I made using my own homemade sprays!

To start, you will need: Inktense Blocks, Grate 'n' Shake, water and some Spritzer Bottles 

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

Start by grating an Inktense Block into the Grate 'n' Shake, the amount will depend on the intensity of colour that you want for your spray (you can always add more colour to it later if the colour isn't strong enough).

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

Roll a scrap of paper into a cone and use it to funnel the powder into the Spritzer bottle, add some water to the bottle (put the lid on!) and shake to mix.  

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

You can also grate two blocks into a Spritzer bottle to mix different colours! 

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

You can then use your custom Ink Sprays on all of your craft projects (even fabric, as I accidently found out by not checking which way round the nozzle was and spraying my top!) I used mine to create this Art Journaling page... 

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

I used a Doodle Doll stamp, a chipboard heart, a stencil with opaque white spray and added some doodling and Dymo label text. Here are a couple of close ups... 

Make your own Ink Sprays with Inktense Blocks

I hope you'll have a go at making your own ink sprays with Inktense Blocks. If you'd like to share your projects over on the Derwent Facebook page we'd love to see them! I’ll be back soon with another project.


Sarah x

www.sarahhurley.com

Comments
11:11 by Sarah Hurley Sarah Hurley

Art Prize 2014 Judge: Anita Taylor

28 April 2014

Derwent Art Prize judge, Anita Taylor tells us about herself and her thoughts on the Prize.

Art Prize 2014 Judge: Anita Taylor

Would you like tell us about your background?

I am an artist, educator and exhibition-maker, with a particular focus on drawing. I drew my way through a Fine Art degree at what is now the University of Gloucestershire and then studied MA Painting at the Royal College of Art in London. I then went on to be Artist in Residence at Durham Cathedral, Cheltenham Fellow in Painting and started teaching across the UK in numerous art schools. I became Head of Painting at Gloucestershire in 1991 and in 2003, as Deputy Head of Art, Media and Design, I left to work at Wimbledon School of Art where there was an innovative Centre for Drawing exploring the role of drawing in artistic practices and the first MA Drawing course in the UK. The Jerwood Drawing Prize, which I founded in 1994 (for the first year it was the Rexel Derwent Open Drawing exhibition), moved with me to Wimbledon and became part of the Centre and retains an affiliation to Wimbledon today. In 2009, I relocated to Sydney for four years to lead the National Art School. I returned to the UK in 2013 to take up the role of Dean of Bath School of Art and Design at Bath Spa University. As an Adjunct Professor of the University of Sydney, affiliated to Sydney College of the Arts, I am able to sustain and develop the many vibrant Australian links in drawing practice and research I have made. I passionately believe that the act of drawing remains a fundamental means to convey and to analyse our experiences of the world(s) we inhabit.

This is the second year of the Derwent Art Prize – did you feel particularly drawn to any of last years’ shortlisted works?

I enjoyed a number of the drawings including Full of Stars Drawing, CHRIS DUNSEATH; Pillar, CHARLOTTE HODES; Fanfare for a common man, BERNARD NAO KITAMA; brill, VICTORIA LOCHHEAD; Noon, RYOTARO YAMANAKA.

Art Prize 2014 Judge: Anita Taylor

Ryotaro Yamanaka: Noon

What will you be looking for when judging the 2014 Derwent Art Prize? 

Drawings that have an authentic voice, and that are superbly rendered.

In your view, what attributes does a successful drawing have? Is it the pencil lines, movement within the piece, the translation of the subject on paper? We’d love to hear your thoughts.

Inherently, a successful drawing is one that is fit for purpose and inventive within its means - a consummate synthesis of idea, form and content. One that creates equivalence to the experience or communication at hand, and one that can apprehend and captivate the viewer (and maker) to find a new or renewed relationship with, and understanding of, what it conveys.

Who inspires you in the world of drawing?

An enormous range of artists, writers on drawing, those who use drawing in the course of their professional and personal lives, and those who have taught me and who I teach with. I am incredibly fortunate to work with many really inspiring people in the world of drawing through the Jerwood Drawing Prize project, and in higher education. Inspirational drawings I have recently seen include those by William Kentridge, Sol LeWitt, Philip Guston, Agnes Martin, Kathe Kollwitz, Mike Parr, Sheela Gowda, Utamaro, Matisse, Rembrandt, Michael Craig-Martin, and many more.

How important is drawing in education? Do you feel there’s enough emphasis on drawing and translating ideas with pencil and paper?

The role of drawing in education is critical, and not just to the creative disciplines in art and design for which it is foundational. Drawing is a primary visual language, essential in terms of communication and expression, and as important as the development of writing skills. Our need to understand the world through visual means is more acute than ever, as images transcend the barriers of language, and enhance communication in an increasingly international world. Drawing functions to distinguish and aid us in understanding our complex world through signs and symbols, by mapping and labelling our experience. It can also enable us to discover through seeing – either through our own experience of seeing and observing or through the shared experience of looking at another’s drawn record of an experience. It can have a transitory or temporal relationship with the world; or provide a record of lasting permanence. It can be propositional, preparatory, visionary, imaginative, factual, generative, transformative, or performative, in the realisation of ideas and concepts.

The need for greater drawing skills in those entering employment has been identified by a range of industries in the creative sector, including animation, film, architecture, art practice, design, theatre and performance and in the communication industries. Drawing is widely used within a range of professions as a means to develop, document, explore, explain and interrogate. This includes the fields of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, medicine, sport, and law. I see drawing as an essential part of the curriculum at all levels for all subjects, and something for which a clear commitment needs to be made. With pencil and paper in hand we are able to explore, depict and make a universe.

What advice would you give to those wishing to enter the Prize this year?

Make drawings you believe in and ensure you submit good reproductions for the selection process, along with all the necessary details (title, size, medium, date).

To enter the Derwent Art Prize 2014, please visit www.derwent-artprize.com for more information.

Comments
14:17 by Kirsty Vickers Kirsty Vickers

Make Your Own Journaling Cards

26 November 2013

If you're a crafter or scrapbooker, you won't have missed that pocket style scrapbooking such as Project Life that has been everywhere lately! It's definitely one of my new obsessions, so I thought I would have a go at mixing it with one of my other obsessions; Derwent Inktense blocks!

Most journaling cards come in either 3" x 4" or 4" x 6" sizes, so I started by cutting some watercolour paper to those sizes as my base. Then I collected together some brushes, sponges, stencils and stamps, along with my Inktense Blocks and got to work!

Make Your Own Journaling Cards

Firstly I made the base colour, using the blocks on sponge or brushes and through stencils to make a variety of effects - plain bold colours, gradients and stencils to make chevron and hexagon patterns - you really can experiment and make whatever colour or theme you like with these and they end up really bold and vivid too, I love the finished effect!

Make Your Own Journaling Cards

This yellow one I made with a hexagon mask, dabbing over colour with a brush, you can see it blurred a bit under the stencil in the middle but I quite like the softer effect there as it gives a less bold area for journaling. The stencil wasn't quite as wide as the card so it left a border each side, I emphasised this with some doodled stitching and added a stamped sentiment to the bottom.

Make Your Own Journaling Cards

This one, I used a scrap of the leftover watercolour paper and stamped a Doodle Doll image, which I also coloured in with Inktense blocks; once dry I added some glitter to her dress. I added a doodled border to the card and a stamped sentiment (one of my favourite sayings!) before sticking the doll to one side - I think this one ended up being my favourite! 

Make Your Own Journaling Cards

For these little ones I simply added some stamped and doodled images to finish, and here is my complete set of cards ready for a future Project Life spread...

Make Your Own Journaling Cards

I hope you'll give Inktense Blocks a try to make your Project Life / Journaling Cards! If you'd like to share your projects over on the Derwent Facebook page we'd love to see them! I’ll be back soon with another project.


Sarah x

www.sarahhurley.com

Comments
10:30 by Sarah Hurley Sarah Hurley

Coloursoft Pencils on Kraft Card

28 August 2013

Today I'm sharing a very quick and simple card using stamping and (my favourite!) Coloursoft pencils onto Kraft card...

Coloursoft Pencils on Kraft Card

I wanted to show how bright and vibrant the pencils are, even onto coloured card. I started by folding a piece of Kraft card in half and cutting it down to a 5" x 5" square. I used a Memento black inkpad to stamp the little boy stamp (from Stampin Up) into the right hand corner and the birthday greeting (from the same stamp set) into the top left corner.

Coloursoft Pencils on Kraft Card

I then used my Coloursoft pencils to colour in the image; you can see how vibrant the colours are, even onto coloured cardstock, and they blend beautifully on the slightly rough texture of the card.

Coloursoft Pencils on Kraft Card

Once coloured, I used a black fineliner pen to doodle a frame around the edge of the card as a finishing touch.

Coloursoft Pencils on Kraft Card

I hope you'll give Coloursoft Pencils a try with different colours of paper and card! If you'd like to share your projects over on the Derwent Facebook page we'd love to see them! I’ll be back soon with another project.


Sarah x

www.sarahhurley.com

Comments
10:00 by Sarah Hurley Sarah Hurley

Inktense Coloured Embossing

15 July 2013

Today, I wanted to show you how to add a new lease of life to your embossing folders using Inktense pencils and blocks!

Inktense Coloured Embossing

I've used a Sizzix embossing folder in my Bigshot machine with watercolour paper. As you can see, it looks lovely even left white, but I wanted to add a little bit of interest with some bold colour!

Inktense Coloured Embossing

I used a Waterbrush with my Inktense Blocks (you could use pencils if you prefer, I just had the blocks to hand) to start to add colour to the raised areas.

Inktense Coloured Embossing

Once this had dried I added a touch of sparkle with some Stickles glitter glue to the flowers.

Inktense Coloured Embossing

I liked the way it looked just by itself so I adhered it straight to a card blank with no additional embellishments.

You could also add washes in just one colour for patterns or use them for backgrounds, rather than the main focus of the card, as I have here - the possibilities are endless! So dig out your embossing folders and give them a new lease of life!

I hope you'll give Inktense Blocks a try with your embossing folders! If you'd like to share your projects over on the Derwent Facebook page we'd love to see them! I’ll be back soon with another project.


Sarah x

www.sarahhurley.com

Comments
10:00 by Sarah Hurley Sarah Hurley

Team Derwent Raises Over £1000 for Charity

23 April 2013

Six members of Team Derwent took part in the Workington to Keswick challenge a couple of weeks ago! Lisa Hawkrigg (Accounts), Judy Marsland (HR), Jason Birbeck (Purchasing), Phyllis Meckin (Manufacturing), Anthony Robinson (IT) and his wife Lesley battled against wind and rain to take part in the walk. Here, Lisa tells us her account:

"The weather conditions were terrible but the organisers, having already postponed it once due to snow, really couldn’t postpone it again. So on Sunday morning at 7.30am our small but happy band set out in the torrential, often horizontal rain and gale force winds to walk the 32 miles to Keswick. The conditions were so bad that 109 people who had pre entered did not even bother turning up on the day!

We were soaked to the skin by the time we passed the factory and going over Fangs Brow the rain felt like needles on the side of our faces. We had to wade through knee deep flooding at Lorton (or scale fences and walls to get round it!) to get to the check point.  Unfortunately, Phyllis and Lesley had to retire due to injury at Buttermere, but they both did amazingly well to get that far (19 miles).  The rest of us then had to struggle up Honister through 60 mile an hour head winds but at least the rain had stopped at this point.

The last few miles to Keswick seemed to go on for ever and we were all hurting but we finally made it to the finish line in just over 10 hours."

Team Derwent Raises Over £1000 for Charity

I asked a few members of the team about their own experiences...

Anthony, what were the best and worst things about the walk?
The best thing about the walk was, even though the weather was hideous, we were all able to still laugh about the situation we were in...most of the time!

The worst thing was the weather... and that horrible bit of road flooded by glacial water we had to walk through just before the second checkpoint.

Judy, what drove you on to complete the walk?
Staring hard at the back of Lisa's heels and the thought of hot pies at the end!

Jason, do you feel like the preparation you did for the walk helped on the day? If so, in what way?
The preparation for the walk was invaluable. Getting back out and doing regular practice walks at the weekends was the only way to go. Just getting used to walking longer distances on tarmac was a big thing in itself. Nothing, however, really prepares you for 65mph winds and driving rain!

Phyllis, can you give me a few words about your experiences during the last few years of doing the W2K walk?
I usually like to start preparing for the walk at least 3 months beforehand. I try to walk every day but this year, with other commitments, it was difficult. This year was a big low; I was so disappointed I couldn’t carry on past Buttermere.

I did the walk one year on my own it was supposed to have been with someone else but she dropped out. It was pleasant because as you went along everyone spoke and passed the time of day and as everyone walked at different speeds it passed the time away.

As I was walking along Borrowdale I met a lad from Seaton so we walked into Keswick together and when we got towards town we started running up the main street; it was funny because people started clapping as we went past.

Well done to the team!

Comments
14:47 by Rebecca Watson Rebecca Watson

Want to win a set of these?

7 March 2013

To celebrate the launch of the fashion inspired Coloursoft Special Edition set, we're giving away 2 sets along with 2 beautiful fashion journals from Laurence King. Both the journal and tin were illustrated by Niki Pilkington and make the perfect companion for any fashionista!

THIS CONTEST HAS NOW FINISHED! The winners were Kathryn Barstow and Allison_HVK!

 

Want to win a set of these?

Want to win a set of these?

• No purchase necessary.
• Winners will be picked at random from all entries received.
• Only one entry per person on the blog & one via Twitter
• Closing date for entries 20th March 2013.
• Not open to employees of the Cumberland Pencil Co, ACCO, their families and its agencies.
• This competition is open internationally.
• Winners will be notified within 14 days of the draw taking place.
• No cash alternative will be offered.
• Submission of entry constitutes acceptance of the terms and conditions.
• Promoter: ACCO UK Ltd, trading as The Cumberland Pencil Co, Derwent House, Lillyhall Business Park, Workington, Cumbria, CA14 5HS.

Comments
10:04 by Rebecca Watson Rebecca Watson

Top Tips Series 2: Graham Bradshaw

19 February 2013

Graham Bradshaw returns with some more fantastic tips for drawing in graphite.

Rendering

These days pencil artists are using techniques which make pencil lines disappear & as a result you get a much more photo realistic look to your portrait. We use tools such as torillons, cotton buds or even tissue paper. Some artists use graphite dust & paint brushes; this is known as the dry brush technique. Personally I use tortillons so this is the method I’ll explain in more detail.

A tortillon is otherwise known as a blending or paper stump which is made of compressed rolled up paper & used to blend graphite after you’ve applied it to an area. To get the best results you’ll need to apply the pencil as smooth as possible keeping your strokes close together (fig1).

Top Tips Series 2: Graham Bradshaw

Whilst doing this you’ll have to also create the shade & depth you need for the specific area which is not only done by the grade of pencil you’re using but also the pressure you apply to the pencil (this does of course take practice & can only be determined by the artist’s eye & ability). Once you’re happy with the rendered area use the blending stump in a circular motion to smear the graphite (fig2). Use as little pressure as possible to begin with then gradually build it up to a nice smooth area. Be careful of graphite build up on your tortillon because you’ll soon find it will no longer

be effective. You can either clean it on a scrap piece of paper or more effectively on a piece of sand paper.

Top Tips Series 2: Graham Bradshaw

This method of rendering is really effective on skin tones, around eyes, noses & ears. I also use it for creating hair which appears blurred & out of focus.

Depth

Creating dark areas with a pencil always seems to become the topic of conversation whenever I upload images of my work online. Some artists use charcoal which is a great way of getting dark black areas without the graphite shine. They still consider themselves graphite artists which is fine, although in my opinion the drawing has now become mixed media. I have been thinking about using this method myself at some point but at present I use the dreaded 9B to create my dark areas. Using the 9B in such a way will always cause graphite shine unfortunately it’s unavoidable; I’m not going to lie. So the best way to deal with this is to try & control it the best you can by drawing in deep circular motions instead of scribbling long deep lines; this will help the appearance of the drawing when you look upon it directly (Fig1). Applying 9B to paper is very similar to the methods used by tattoo artists when applying colour & shading to skin; deep circular motions.

Top Tips Series 2: Graham Bradshaw

I will stress that without using charcoal or a black pencil this shine will always be the downside to using graphite pencil.

Graham will be back next week with another set of top tips. Visit Graham's website for more inspiration.

Visit our website for more information on Graphic Pencils.

Comments
09:00 by Rebecca Watson Rebecca Watson

Art Journaling with Aquatones

8 February 2013

Today I'm sharing one of my art journal pages, I don't often share these but this one I'm making an exception for as I had such fun making it with my Aquatone sticks! Aquatone is probably the most fun art material I've had since I was a child with a box of crayons in every colour. These highly pigmented sticks of colour blend with water to create the most rich, intense and vibrant colours; I just love using them whenever I can, especially in my art journaling!

Art Journaling with Aquatones

 

For this page, done in my little Derwent Journal, I lightly misted the page with water and then blended the colours, starting with the lightest yellow in the middle out to the darkest purple at the edges. Once dry I went over again, this time wetting the Aquatone sticks and going over where I thought I needed more colour or to blend the colours together better - I love the way these layer...

Art Journaling with Aquatones

Once it was dry, I then misted and spattered some white spray over the top, I thought it looked like stars so I knew then exactly what to doodle over it!

Art Journaling with Aquatones

Once the spray was dry I then used a black pen to doodle my picture over the top, finishing with a border and the quote, one of my favourites. I finally added some silver stars which I also doodled around to make them stand out...

Art Journaling with Aquatones

I hope you'll give Aquatone, and Art Journaling, a try - it's a great free way to make art! If you'd like to share your projects over on the Derwent Facebook page we'd love to see them! I’ll be back soon with another project.


Sarah x

www.sarahhurley.com

Comments
10:00 by Sarah Hurley Sarah Hurley